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Certifications

CERTIFICATION COMPETENCY GUIDELINES

  • These guidelines reflect the minimum desirable characteristics for CHA certification.
  • For riding instructor/trail guide certification the term riding instructor refers to an individual who teaches horsemanship theory and application to one or more students. The purpose of these lessons may range from teaching minimum skills for one-time recreational riders to the coaching of serious competitive riders.
  • Have strong safety awareness, able to help avoid and manage emergency situations; able to implement and evaluate a risk management plan, written and unwritten, for group riding programs.
  • Have the ability to independently and safely catch, halter, lead, tie, groom and tack horses.
  • For riding instructor/trail guide certification - able to ride safely and competently at the walk, trot/jog, canter/lope, in the arena or an open riding area
  • For riding instructor/trail guide certification have knowledge of horsemanship theory and riding skills, beyond the level at which they teach. to, observing students during lessons, effectively communicating instruction and providing physical assistance when necessary.
  • All other certification participants need to have knowledge of horsemanship theory and skills appropriate to their specific certification.
  • Be generally familiar with human anatomy, physiology, psychology, balance, coordination and motion as relavant to the certification; able to evaluate and reduce unnecessary physical discomfort and stress, and design exercises and activities, both mounted and unmounted, to assist rider progress.
  • Have the ability to design, implement and evaluate methods of effective instruction to strengthen performance for both horse and rider.
  • Have a basic knowledge and understanding of equine anatomy and physiology; can implement basic management practices related to feeding, health care, maintenance and use of horses, can detect, prevent and manage equine lameness, sickness and disease. Will demonstrate and mandate kind, caring and humane attitudes and treatment of horses at all times.
  • Have the ability to assess the suitability, condition, fit and adjustment of all tack and equipment used in the program.
  • Have a basic understanding of professional standards and behavior, set a good example in personal attitudes, language, appearance and behavior at all times. Have knowledge of and comply with legal and ethical requirements related to duty of care, liability and professional conduct.

 

STANDARD INSTRUCTOR CERTIFICATION

Click here to see sample 15 minute lesson on First Trot

Photo_Lesson.jpgFor group riding instructors dealing with progressive skill building in all levels of riders, both in the arena and on the trail. Certification may be earned in English and/or Western disciplines; minimum age for assistant certification is 16, minimum age for instructor certification is 18. Four levels of certification may be earned in both English and Western disciplines, ranging from assistant instructor to CHA clinician. Level of certification is at the sole discretion of the Clinic Staff and no certification of any kind is guaranteed.

THE CHA CERTIFICATION PROCESS… involves evaluation by two CHA Certified Clinicians, in a 5 day certification clinic held at approved CHA Program Member host site facilities. CHA certification clinics involve teaching at least four practice lessons, a riding evaluation, a written test and participation in workshops on risk management, teaching techniques, professionalism and herd management. Certification is awarded at the end of the clinic and the level of certification attained (if any) is the sole discretion of the two CHA Clinicians conducting the clinic. Certification is valid for three years from the certification date; the instructor must maintain annual individual membership in CHA. Instructors may recertify at the end of the three-year certification period by providing documentation of at least 25 hours of continuing education and work within the industry. The only way to raise the level of certification is to attend another CHA certification clinic. Seasonal equestrian staff certification requires a different certification process; please refer to the section below.

They must be able to mount, dismount and ride at the walk, trot and canter/lope on the correct lead, with good form and control in a group, in the arena and in the open. Instructor candidates must be able to ride above the level that they will be certified to teach (for exceptional circumstances, see Special Considerations under "Instructor Competency Guidelines" in the CHA Clinic Instructor's Manual).

  • ASSISTANT INSTRUCTOR: English and/or Western, qualified to assist in a lesson or trail ride, under the supervision of a certified instructor.
  • LEVEL ONE INSTRUCTOR: qualified to provide foundational instruction to beginners, with a strong emphasis on safety and group control; candidates must demonstrate ability in ground handling, mounting, correct position and control at walk-trot.
  • LEVEL TWO INSTRUCTOR: English and/or Western, qualified to improve all aspects of the first level, and progressing through canter/lope, including diagonals, balance of horse and rider, pre-jumping exercises, western patterns, trail riding, etc.
  • LEVEL THREE INSTRUCTOR: English and/or Western, qualified to coach students in improving form, style and understanding of the natural aids, including basic jumping, turn backs to the rail, transitions, school figures and leads with a greater emphasis on horsemanship theory and horse care.
  • LEVEL FOUR INSTRUCTOR: English and/or Western, qualified to improve the performance of advanced riders and their horses, including jumping courses, dressage movements, reining, and other performance events, advanced horse management and horsemanship theory.
  • MASTER INSTRUCTOR: qualified in Level 4, both English and Western; highly experienced in a variety of teaching and management situations.
  • ASSISTANT CLINIC INSTRUCTOR: minimum age 21; prerequisite of Master Instructor certification and recommendation from a CHA Clinic Instructor; qualified to assist in certifying instructors; MI's recommended as an ACI must apply to CHA for ACI certification.
  • CLINIC INSTRUCTOR: minimum age 25; qualified to conduct CHA certification clinics and certify instructors with assistance from another CHA clinician. To become certifed as a CI, the instructor must first attain ACI certification and then assist at a certain number of CHA clinics to qualify as a CHA Clinic Instructor.

 

TRAIL GUIDE CERTIFICATION

For trail guides dealing with rides ranging from short rides to wilderness packing. Trail Guide Certification Clinics are similar in format and content to the Standard Clinic, but involve two nights at a base camp and three nights on the trail and includes camping skills, environmental issues and trail ethics. Minimum age for assistants is 16; minimum age for guides is 18; certification may be earned at seven levels. Level of certification is the sole discretion of the Trail Clinic Staff and is determined by skills and knowledge demonstrated during the clinic.Photo_of_trail_ride.jpg

  • ASSISTANT GUIDE: qualified to assist on trail rides under the direction and supervision of a certified trail guide.
  • TRAIL GUIDE: qualified to conduct trail rides not exceeding one full day in duration, including securing horses away from the base stable, as might be needed for breaks.
  • OVERNIGHT GUIDE: qualified to take riders on overnight campouts on the program's property, with support from the host facility (does not necessarily use packhorses).
  • PACKING GUIDE: qualified to manage horses and people for longer periods and in camping situations in non-wilderness areas, including simple horse packing and the double diamond hitch.
  • WILDERNESS GUIDE: qualified to manage a riding program and organize and conduct extended pack trips into back country wilderness areas, able to use a variety of packing equipment and tie a variety of hitches.
  • TRAIL ASSISTANT CLINIC INSTRUCTOR: minimum age of 21, prerequisite of Wilderness Guide certification, must be recommended to become a trail clinician by a CHA Trail Clinician and apply to CHA for TACI certification.
  • TRAIL CLINIC INSTRUCTOR: minimum age 25; qualified to conduct CHA trail certification clinics and certify trail guides with assistance from another CHA Trail Clinician. To become certifed as a TCI, the guide must first attain TACI certification and then assist at a certain number of CHA clinics to qualify as a CHA Trail Clinic Instructor.

DAY RIDE TRAIL GUIDE CERTIFICATION

For trail guides dealing with rides from very short up to day long. Day Ride Trail Guide Certification Clinics are similar in format and content to the Standard Clinic, but there is an emphasis on trail guiding skills displays rather than teaching lessons. It is a three day clinic with renewable certification and includes workshops on topics such as Planning/Supervising Trail Rides, Risk management/Accident Prevention/Emergency Procedures, Horse/Equipment Management and Low Impact Trail Riding.. Minimum age for assistants is 16; minimum age for guides is 18. Level of certification is the sole discretion of the Clinic Staff and is determined by skills and knowledge demonstrated during the clinic.

  • ASSISTANT DAY RIDE TRAIL GUIDE: qualified to assist on trail rides under the direction and supervision of a certified trail guide.
  • DAY RIDE TRAIL GUIDE: qualified to conduct trail rides not exceeding one full day in duration, including securing horses away from the base stable, as might be needed for breaks.

 

COMBINED INSTRUCTOR/TRAIL GUIDE CERTIFICATION CLINICS 

For use in recreational programs, lower level instructional programs and programs that include both progressive skill building and trailriding. Combined Certification Clinics offer both Standard Instructor Certification and Trail Guide Certification, up to the second level in each program. Certification may be attained in both English and Western as a guide and/or an instructor.

  • ASSISTANT GUIDE: qualified to assist a CHA certified instructor or trail guide on simple trail rides.
  • TRAIL GUIDE: qualified to guide rides not exceeding one day in length.
  • OVERNIGHT GUIDE: qualified to lead supported overnight rides on the facility's property.
  • ASSISTANT INSTRUCTOR: qualified to assist a CHA certified instructor in arena lessons.
  • LEVEL ONE INSTRUCTOR: qualified to provide foundational instruction to beginners.
  • LEVEL TWO INSTRUCTOR: qualified to improve all aspects of Level 1, up to introduction of canter/lope.

 

INSTRUCTORS OF RIDERS WITH DISABILITIES CERTIFICATION

For instructors working in programs that provide recreational, instructional, or mainstream riding for persons with disabilities. The materials and curriculum of these certification clinics are specific to the various considerations, adaptations, applications, contraindications, adaptive equipment, and horses used in riding programs that serve persons with physical and/or cognitive disabilities. CHA awards certification as an Instructor of Riders with Disabilities at the following levels:  Assistant Instructor, Level One Instructor, Level Two Instructor, and Level Three Instructor.

Certification Qualifications

 IRD Assistant Certification:    

  • Minimum eighteen (18) years of age.
  • Minimum five (5) hours of working with persons with disabilities in any capacity.
  • Qualified to assist in the instruction of riders with disabilities under a certified instructor.

 IRD Level One Certification

  • Minimum eighteen (18) years of age.
  • Hold a current CPR and First Aid certification.
  • Minimum of 25 hours teaching riding to persons with disabilities.
  • Pass the IRD written examination with a minimum score of 70%.
  • Pass the Standard written examination with a minimum score of 70%.
  • Qualified to teach riders with cognitive &/or physical disabilities, up to level Two horsemanship skills when applicable.

  IRD Level Two Certification

  • Minimum twenty-one (21) years of age.
  • Hold a current CPR and First Aid certification.
  • Documented a minimum 120 hours of teaching riders with disabilities.
  • Pass IRD written examination with a minimum score of 80%
  • Pass the Standard written examination with a minimum score of 80%.
  • Qualified to teach riders with cognitive &/or physical disabilities up to Level Three horsemanship where applicable.

IRD Level Three Certification

  • Minimum twenty-one (21) years of age.
  • Hold current CPR and First Aid certification.
  • Document a minimum of 160 hours of teaching riders with disabilities.
  • Pass the IRD written examination with a minimum score of 90%.
  • Pass the Standard written examination with a minimum score of 85%.
  • Highly qualified in horsemanship skills and knowledge of disabilities and demonstrate a strong knowledge of how to address the required issues inherent within each disability.
  • Qualified to teach riders with cognitive &/or physical disabilities up to Level Four horsemanship where applicable.

 IRD Assistant Clinic Instructor (DACI)

  • Minimum twenty-five (25) years of age.
  • Hold current CPR and First Aid certification.
  • Document a minimum of 180 hours of teaching riders with disabilities.
  • Prior to recommendation of assistant clinic instructor must attend a CHA standard clinic achieving at least Level Three instructor certification in one seat with Level One in the other.
  • Pass the IRD written examination with a score of 90% or above.
  • Candidates must apply to CHA for DACI status and must take an additional written examination.

 IRD Clinic Instructor (DCI)

  • Minimum twenty-five (25) years of age. 
  • In addition to above requirements for DACI, receive two recommendations from two separate clinic instructors at different facilities. 
  • Must apply to CHA for Clinic Instructor status. 

SEASONAL EQUESTRIAN STAFF CERTIFICATION

The Seasonal Equestrian Staff Certification (SESC) was developed to meet the needs of seasonal riding program operators, such as summer camps, youth organizations, guest ranches and trail program operators. For Seasonal Equestrian staff participant must be 18 an for Assistant Seasonal Equestrian Staff participant must be 16. The purpose of the SESC program is to provide training and certification for seasonal or temporary riding staff that work under the supervision of a certified instructor or guide.

The SESC program is offered only to the riding staff of a CHA Program Member facility that work under the supervision of a Level 2 or higher CHA certified Instructor or Guide. SESC certification is valid only at the Program Member's facility and is a non-renewable certification. The SESC is conducted in 2-3 days and is staffed by one CHA Clinic Instructor (Standard or Trail), who is assisted by the certified instructor on staff at the facility.

SESC clinics require a minimum of 24 hours of clinic time, excluding meals and rest periods. Participants will take a written test of 50 questions on basic horsemanship and safety, will have a riding skill evaluation, will teach two demonstration lessons and attend required lectures on risk management and teaching techniques. At the end of the clinic, the CHA clinician will complete written reports on each participant, which includes evaluation of safety awareness, horsemanship ability, teaching skills and group control.

CERTIFICATION EARNED: Participants may earn certification as Seasonal Equestrian Staff or Assistant Seasonal Equestrian Staff. This certification is valid only at the CHA Program Member facility where the individual is employed or sponsored and enables them to work only under the supervision of a CHA Certified Instructor or Guide (Level 2 or higher). Participants will be evaluated according to Level 1 or Assistant Standard or Trail horsemanship skills. Seasonal certification is non-renewable and expires at the end of the calendar year.

 

SKILLS CLINICS

CHA Skills Clinics are single-day or multi-day events covering:

  1. Any topic covered in any of the CHA Certification Programs, or
  2. How to teach any topic covered in any CHA Certification Program.

All topics taught in CHA Skills Clinics must be of a nature that is generally covered in current CHA Certification Programs.  Topics such as starting colts, round pen reasoning or specific performance level disciplines cannot be currently covered under the auspices of CHA, since CHA does not currently have certifications to support these techniques.

All advertisements for CHA Skills Clinics shall include the content being covered in the clinic and must also include the level at which the clinic is being taught (i.e., Level 1-4).

CHA Skills clinics may be taught by one or more CHA Certified Instructor(s) with a current certification one level higher than the intended levels to be covered in the clinic. The instructor must receive prior approval from the CHA Program Director to staff a skills clinic. This approval will be part of the clinic application process.

CHA Skills Clinics may be conducted at any suitable facility; the site does not have to be a CHA Program Member.

An application to conduct a CHA Skills Clinic shall be submitted to the CHA office and referred to the CHA Program Director for final approval. The application will include:

  • A clinic request form
  • A clinic syllabus including clinic content and information on instructor qualifications
  • A reference from a CHA Clinic Instructor addressing the instructor’s suitability to conduct a skills clinic.

The CHA office will maintain a file on the skills clinics that have been approved and conducted. This file shall contain the instructor’s application material only. There will be no official evaluations of participants or the instructor. The instructor may ask for participant evaluations for their own use and may provide CHA certificates of participation to clinic participants. CHA Skills Clinics may count as continuing education credit for certified instructors enrolled in the clinic.

To register a skills clinic with CHA, the instructor should submit a Clinic Request Form, Clinic syllabus with instructor qualifications and clinic content and a professional reference from a CHA clinician. The CHA Program Director will review the application for approval of the CHA Skills Clinic within seven working days from the date the paperwork is received in the CHA office. The cost to host a skills clinic is $250, which includes CHA insurance and certificates for participants. The clinic fee must be paid upon approval of the clinic.

 

EQUINE FACILITY MANAGER

The Equine Facility Management (EFM) program is a twenty-hour certification clinic to evaluate participants on their skills and knowledge of equine facility management. Participants will demonstrate skills and take a written test at each of four levels of certification. Each participant starts at level 1 and may proceed to the next level upon successful completion of each level and may receive up to Level 4 Certification during the twenty-hour clinic.

Certification clinics will be held at commercial equine operations (more than 35 head) that offer a diversity of functions to enable testing the program content through all four levels. Ideal host sites would include boarding/lesson/training operations, trail/dude operations, college facilities, competition centers, breeding farms, etc.

 

LEVELS OF (EFM) CERTIFICATION

There are four levels of certification and participants must advance through the levels by taking a written test and doing skills demonstration at each level. Candidates for certification must have the knowledge and skills at any given level prior to the clinic; CHA will not certify newfound knowledge or skills.

These four levels of certification are available:

Level 1 - Stable Worker: Qualified to work in a barn under the supervision of a manager. Minimum age is 16.

Level 2 - Stable Manager: Qualified to manage a small private stable of up to 10 head and 1-2 employees. Minimum age is 18.

Level 3 - Herd Manager: Qualified to manage a public equine facility of up to 35 head and 3-4 employees. Minimum age is 18.

Level 4 - Equine Facility Manager: Qualified as general manger of a commercial equine operation greater than 35 head and with five or more employees. Minimum age is 21.

See expanded content in each level below.

 

MINIMUM COMPETENCY

For Level One EFM Certification, minimum competency requires the ability to safely catch, halter, lead and secure horses without assistance; safely execute feeding and stable chores; basic horse knowledge including parts of the horse, signs of health and basic behavior.

 

AREAS OF EVALUATION 

Participants will be evaluated on skills and knowledge by two CHA Certified EFM Clinicians, in five areas:

  1. Safety
  2. Horse Handling
  3. Horse Husbandry
  4. Facilities and Equipment
  5. Professionalism

The standard clinic staff certification process will apply to EFM.

 

CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

In order to receive any certification, the EFM candidate must meet the following requirements:

  • Minimum age requirements apply
  • Complete a certification clinic of at least twenty (20) hours
  • Attain a score of 31 or higher on the EFM Evaluation form, with a minimum average score of seven (7) in the safety category
  • An EFM candidate is evaluated on the ability to work safely and effectively in a stable and is evaluated by written tests, oral examination, and skills demonstration.
  • Candidates must pass each level consecutively to attain level-4 certification.
  • Certification is valid for three years from the date of certification and individuals must maintain membership in CHA.
  • Recertification is possible by application and proof of continued activity in the horse industry and at least 25 hours of continuing education.
  • The only way to raise the level of EFM certification is to attend another certification clinic. Participants must wait a minimum of six months after an EFM clinic to attend another EFM certification clinic.

 

PROGRAM CONTENT

The following skills/knowledge will be demonstrated at each level, by either a written test or a hands-on skills demonstration, oral examination.

  1. Stable Worker: safe horse handling, stall cleaning, turn out, feeding, parts of the horse, signs of wellness and sickness, securing horses.
  2. Stable Manager: basic equine nutrition, horse first-aid and wound care; vital signs; routine health maintenance; grooming and bathing; bedding and manure management; hoof care; bandaging and protective boots; animal welfare.
  3. Herd Manager: resource management (facility, equipment, supplies); scheduling staff and programs; risk management; stallion/broodmare care; pasture management; infectious disease control; record keeping; medications and supplements; personnel management; environmental impact; communication skills; herd nutrition; saddle fit; emergency procedures.
  4. Equine Facility Manager: business and personnel development; budgeting commercial operations; strategic planning; policies and procedures; employment law and payroll; insurance; communication skills; people skills; conflict resolution; federal regulations; animal welfare; show grooming and clipping; horse selection and evaluation; staff training; disaster planning.

 

CERTIFICATION CLINIC REQUIREMENTS

  • Required Seminars such as Introduction to CHA and the clinic process; Herd Management; Professionalism, Risk Management
  • Written tests- participants will take a written test and a minimum passing grade of 70% is required.
  • Skills Demonstrations and/or Lesson Teaching
  • Interviews with Clinic Staff

 

VAULTING COACH CERTIFICATION

Vaulting is the art of gymnastics on the back of a moving horse. It is one of seven equestrian disciplines recognized by the Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI) for international competition and its history dates back to Roman times. It has been an important part of equestrian training, especially cavalry training, for generations. As a competitive sport it is stylized and disciplined. As a recreational activity and teaching aid it is enormously adaptable in scope and application.

Vaulting requires the teamwork of the vaulter, horse & longeur. Vaulting may be done as individuals, pairs or as teams. Vaulters may be doing compulsory exercises on the horse in their first lesson.

Vaulting is a specialized horse activity that is fun.  It improves confidence, balance, timing, strength, and suppleness, thus making participants’ better, more secure horseback riders. Since one vaulting horse can address the needs of many vaulters, it is a great way to offer equine opportunity to many participants.

Vaulting diversifies and enhances any horsemanship program, both for able-bodied and disabled equestrians. A growing number of riding instructors, schools, camps and therapeutic programs are using vaulting to improve their students' skills.

To learn more about the sport of vaulting visit the American Vaulting Association web site at www.americanvaulting.org

 

HOW CAN VAULTING FIT INTO MY CURRENT RIDING PROGRAM?

Lesson Program: Many stables choose to develop a complete vaulting lesson program as an adjunct to their riding program. Others use vaulting techniques on a more limited basis, individualizing their vaulting instruction to address specific rider challenges (build confidence, increase understanding and feel of horse movement, create awareness of rider body position / muscle isolation and its effects on the horse, etc.).

Camp Program : Vaulting is a fun addition to a camp program as it provides opportunities for team building among campers, channels their energy into a positive learning experience, and expands their confidence and sense of accomplishment in a short period of time.

Youth Association or Club: Vaulting provides an exciting challenge for club members to work together while improving their horsemanship skills and equine knowledge. Whether vaulting is used for clinics, demonstrations or competitions, it allows for diversity in rider/vaulter skills, horse breed or use, and economic level of the participant.

Therapeutic Program: As vaulting allows for great variety in rider positions and movements, it provides an excellent way for therapeutic students to set and achieve goals while increasing their strength, flexibility and balance. With options for individual or team efforts, vaulting offers unlimited opportunities for physical and social development.

 

ABOUT CHA VAULTING COACH CERTIFICATION

Overview of the Vaulting Coach Certification Clinic

The goal of the Vaulting Coach Certification (VCC) clinics is to provide the vaulting community a certification process through which participants may be evaluated in their skills as coaches to provide a safe, enjoyable and effective vaulting program.

A 24 hour certification clinic, conducted in three days, is held as a stand-alone clinic. Certification is available at three levels and qualifies the individual to coach vaulting through walk/ trot and up to canter in either a recreational and/or competition vaulting program.

The Vaulting Coach Certification is conducted by two CHA VCC Clinicians, whose job it is to evaluate the coaching skills of each participant and offer constructive advice for a safe and effective vaulting program. The level of certification granted, if any, is at the sole discretion of the two CHA clinicians conducting the clinic.

Types and Levels of Vaulting Coach Certification

 

ASSISTANT VAULTING COACH – Qualified to direct warm-up exercises, spot or longe under the direct supervision of a Level 1 or higher certified vaulting coach.

  • Minimum age of 16 years of age.
  • Has a basic understanding of vaulting; minimum written test score of 60%.
  • Shows safety awareness in spotting and longeing.
  • Current membership with American Vaulting Association.

LEVEL ONE Vaulting Coach – Qualified to coach vaulting in a beginner or one-time vaulting program at walk, up to beginning trot.

  • Minimum age of 18 years of age.
  • Has Level 1 understanding of vaulting; minimum written test score of 70%.
  • Shows level 1 equivalent skills listed in Training for Vaulting Coaches.
  • Current membership with American Vaulting Association.

LEVEL TWO Vaulting Coach – Qualified to teach in a vaulting program or club, at walk-trot, up to beginning canter.

  • Is a minimum age of 18 years of age.
  • Has Level 2 understanding of vaulting; minimum written test score of 80%.
  • Shows Level 2 equivalent skills as listed in Training for Vaulting Coaches.
  • Current membership with American Vaulting Association.

LEVEL THREE Vaulting Coach – Qualified to teach in a vaulting program or club, at walk, trot, and canter either recreational &/or competitive.

  • Is a minimum age of 18 years of age.
  • Has Level 3 understanding of vaulting; minimum written test score of 90%.
  • Shows Level 3 equivalent skills as listed in Training for Vaulting Coaches.
  • Current membership with American Vaulting Association.

VCC clinics will be held at sites approved for hosting by the CHA Corporate Office and in addition to the regular host site requirements; the host site needs to offer safe and suitable vaulting areas, equipment and horse, as stated in the American Vaulting Association (AVA) Camps and Club Manual.

For information on hosting a Vaulting Coach Certification clinic, call 800-399-0138 or email pbarger@CHA-ahse.org.

 

DRIVING INSTRUCTOR AND DRIVER CERTIFICATION (DIDC)

For driving instructors who teach group lessons in the camp or commercial driving school setting, and for recreational or commercial drivers. Certification includes single and team driving with multiple vehicle types. Both breast collar and collar harness are addressed. There are several workshops included in this clinic including Teaching Techniques for Driving, Risk Reduction, Passenger Safety in Loading and Unloading, Harness Fit and Adjustment, Road Driving, Emergency Procedures and Professionalism. Minimum age for Assistant is 16 years old, minimum age for driver/driving instructor is 18 years old.

  • Assistant Driver/Instructor: Qualified to assist a certified instructor or driver including grooming, harnessing, ground driving and heading.
  • Level 1 Driver: Qualified to drive single and/or pair recreationally on private property or in an arena; qualified to hitch and unhitch single and/or pairs, including fitting and adjusting harness and vehicle safety checks
  • Level 1 Driving Instructor: Qualified to teach recreational driving on private property, either single and/or pairs.
  • Level 2 Driver: Qualified to hitch and drive single or pair on street or roadway, including ability to correct horse behavior problems, understanding of selection and suitability of driving horses, knowledge of hoof care and common health problems.
  • Level 2 Driving Instructor: Qualified to teach driving on public roads, selection and suitability of driving horses, correcting horse behavior problems, hoof care and common health problems, conformation, lateral and longitudinal alignment, bits and safety equipment.
  • Assistant DIDC Clinic Instructor: Minimum age 21; prerequisite of Level 2 Driving Instructor certification and recommendation from a CHA Clinic Instructor; qualified to assist in certifying drivers and driving instructors; Level 2 DIDC Instructors recommended as an ACI must apply to CHA for ACI certification. Must qualify as instructor for both singles and pairs.
  • CLINIC INSTRUCTOR: Minimum age 25; qualified to conduct CHA certification clinics and certify drivers and driving instructors with assistance from another CHA clinician. To become certified as a CI, the instructor must first attain ACI certification and then assist at a certain number of CHA clinics to qualify as a CHA Clinic Instructor. Must qualify as instructor for both single and pairs.

 

Watch for upcoming Adjunct Certification for Driving Multiples!