Loading... Please wait...
The CHA Way – “Safe, Effective and Fun!”


Previewing the CHA International Conference

Posted on September 15, 2017 07:51 pm

<< Previous Page Next Page >>

By Sarah Evers Conrad with input from CHA's International Conference Speakers

With the 2017 Certified Horsemanship Association’s International Conference right around the corner, several of the speakers offered up a preview of what attendees can learn from their presentations. To see the schedule of all presentations and to read the bios for all of the speakers and descriptions of each presentation, please visit www.chainstructors.com/conference.

Previewing the CHA International Conference
With the 2017 Certified Horsemanship Association’s International Conference right around the corner, several of the speakers offered up a preview of what attendees can learn from their presentations. To see the schedule of all presentations and to read the bios for all of the speakers and descriptions of each presentation, please visit www.chainstructors.com/conference. 
Laura Kelland-May
Laura develops horses and riders and is the founder of “Equestrian Skill Builders series of Horse Show Clinics.” She is also a USEF “R” Judge and an Equestrian Canada “S” Judge and a Senior Steward. She is presenting “What the Judge is Looking for in Over Fences Classes.”
A hunter round or equitation class is more than a beautiful jump and excellent movement.  You have to “nail” each fence. That is what the judge is looking for. 
Getting to the first fence correctly, in a positive, confident manner, sets the tone for the rest of the course. A sloppy tentative ride to the first fence leaves the horse with no confidence, which will show throughout the rest of the hunter round.
On the other hand an aggressive, elbow flapping approach can also leave an impression on the judge. In maybe, not so favorable of a way. The approach to your first fence should show a horse that has confidence, ability, and enough class to carry out the job. You should be giving the impression, “my horse is so wonderful. You would love to ride my horse.”
If your pace needs some minor adjustments, make them in a discrete, diplomatic fashion. While you are on course, you should be giving the impression that your round is smooth and rhythmic. Sudden changes, pulling, kicking, and big body movements will be noticeable and detract from the overall flow of your round.
How do you make a good impression?
Shellie Hensley
Shellie is the co-founder the H Mill Iron Horsemanship, CHA Clinic Staff and a Site Visitor, and is a CHA Board Member. She is presenting “Creative Exercises to Develop a Thinking Rider from the Beginning.”
 
My topic involves thinking outside of the box with beginner riders, and the exercises are geared to directly benefit our lower-level instructors and/or instructors who are working with a lot of beginners. So often, our beginners allow the horse to go on autopilot, either because the rider lacks confidence or they just don't know how to get an animal that outweighs them by at least 1,000 pounds to do what they want or need them to do. That alone becomes a balancing act for the instructor. How do you keep your awesome school horses working appropriately, and how do you get your beginners to think and respond versus panicking and reacting?  The secret to my success is this: Keep It SUPER Simple! Riding shouldn't resemble a science experiment. I have developed a number of exercises and activities to get beginners to think about what they want to ask their horse to do and the confidence to respond in such a way that our good lesson horses focus on the riders rather than zoning out and going on autopilot. No smoke and mirrors, nothing mind blowing, just some simple exercises.
This presentation would be appropriate for instructors who work in busy programs that serve as first touch or the "put ’em up, take ’em down" programs or the one-time riders. The follow-the-leader method is totally acceptable and a good way to control the chaos so that riders have a really good experience and want to return to further develop their horsemanship skills. Take the kids who really want to show. Imagine that walk/trot class at the county fair...you know the one.  Every student seems to have a magnet on their horse, and all of the horses are either walking or trotting in a group...or in one big bunch, more or less. If you are lucky, your rider will either be at the head of the pack or trailing the pack. That way the judge will have a fighting chance to see them! So how do we, as instructors, teach those riders to get out of their response to the situation, make a choice, and find their spot? Simple, show up and watch my class!
Jo-Anne Young
Jo-Anne has been teaching riding and training horses for more than 40 years and has learned from various elite riders and coaches. She is presenting “Engaging the Rider’s Core to Engage the Horse’s Core.”
I will be teaching exercises to help achieve the goal of engaging the rider’s core to engage the horse’s core. Along with exercises, I will have three of the UniSit Strap systems for the riders to try in the workshop. They were developed by Paula Paglia, who is a USDF Gold Medal rider, as well as a trainer and instructor. The system has helped college students in developing an advanced, accurate, and supple seat that has put them on the fast track to advanced levels in their riding. It is also fun to see how much the horses appreciate the riders' improvement through the use of this training aid, which physically shows the rider how to effectively and correctly use his/her core.
Donovan Dobbs
Donovan is a CHA Certified Instructor, who teaches riders of all levels, along with starting colts, working with problem horses, and finishing horses for a variety of western disciplines. He is presenting, “Be a Hero to Your Students, Your Horses, and Yourself.”
My goal is the same for both horses, students, and myself, which is to try and be better than they were yesterday and prepare to be better tomorrow. One way we should do that is to be a hero. A hero is defined as a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities. The noble qualities that I believe are exemplary are humility, endurance, relationship, and obedience. I like these because they equally apply to ourselves, our horsemanship, and our teaching. They are separate and distinct qualities but also entwined in a hero. The questions I hope to answer for the audience are how do these qualities apply to ourselves, our horsemanship, and our teaching. The tips will be simple but effective in their application to this goal. The goal is to be a hero in life, in our horsemanship, and in our teaching. 
Larissa Strappello
Larissa is the Facility Manager and a CHA Master Instructor at Houghton College’s Equestrian Program, as well as being a CHA Assistant Clinic Instructor. She is presenting, “Exercises for Horse and Rider Using Dressage Training Principles.”
My workshop will be covering different dressage exercises and how to teach dressage to all levels, even our most beginner riders. Many times as instructors we forget that even our most beginner students can begin to understand how to get a horse to move correctly from the hind and work on rhythm and relaxation. My hope is to explore different exercise and discuss how you can use the same exercises for your beginner and more advanced riders. We all want our students, whether one is teaching western, jumping, or dressage, to understand the basics of helping the horse use its body correctly. In the workshop, we will discuss strategies to keep all levels of riders engaged and to help our lesson horses stay healthy and happy. 
 
Gerrie Barnes
Gerrie was designated as the 2012 Horseperson of the Year by the Colorado Horse Council and was the 2016 CHA Riding Instructor of the Year for her teaching, coaching, and mentoring skills. She will be presenting “Riding the Horse’s Mind: The Psychology and Leadership of the Horse.”
This topic and my newly published book grew out of the frustrations of many owners and riding students. I’ve watched the horse industry produce more and more clinics, videos, books, and magazine articles devoted to problem-solving.
My question is why do the frustrations remain? Most riders who seek out these resources are intelligent and thoughtful and want to be the best rider for their horses. Why do they not gain their horses’ respect?
This presentation introduces you to the missing piece. Although we know about the horse’s herd instinct, as humans we don’t understand the horse’s level of commitment to this instinct; that horses will literally die over their placement in the herd hierarchy. As humans, we have a different set of needs and values. We need to understand the differences in species and commit to the horses’ needs and what they value. Information is provided that hopefully will help attendees understand their horse at a deeper level.
Suggestions are also provided to help owners and riders enhance their interspecies communication, thus, gaining their horses’ trust and respect. These changes in your attitude, intent, commitment, and consistency should help improve all aspects of their relationship with their horse. It should solve attendees’ frustrations and instill confidence.
The CHA International Conference is set to take place October 26-29, 2017, in Lexington, KY. For more information, or to register, please visit www.CHAinstructors.com/conference.

Beth Powers

In this video interview, CHA President Beth Powers discusses the benefits of the CHA International Conference, her role as the president of the organization, and what makes it a must-attend event.

Laura Kelland-May

Laura develops horses and riders and is the founder of “Equestrian Skill Builders series of Horse Show Clinics.” She is also a USEF “R” Judge and an Equestrian Canada “S” Judge and a Senior Steward. She is presenting:

Top Tips Judges Expect to See in Your Students' Hunter Classes

A hunter round or equitation class is more than a beautiful jump and excellent movement. You have to “nail” each fence. That is what the judge is looking for. Getting to the first fence correctly, in a positive, confident manner, sets the tone for the rest of the course. A sloppy tentative ride to the first fence leaves the horse with no confidence, which will show throughout the rest of the hunter round.

On the other hand an aggressive, elbow flapping approach can also leave an impression on the judge. In maybe, not so favorable of a way. The approach to your first fence should show a horse that has confidence, ability, and enough class to carry out the job. You should be giving the impression, “my horse is so wonderful. You would love to ride my horse.”

If your pace needs some minor adjustments, make them in a discrete, diplomatic fashion. While you are on course, you should be giving the impression that your round is smooth and rhythmic. Sudden changes, pulling, kicking, and big body movements will be noticeable and detract from the overall flow of your round.How do you make a good impression?

Shellie Hensley

Shellie is the co-founder the H Mill Iron Horsemanship, CHA Clinic Staff and a Site Visitor, and is a CHA Board Member. She is presenting:

Creative Exercises to Develop a Thinking Rider from the Beginning

My topic involves thinking outside of the box with beginner riders, and the exercises are geared to directly benefit our lower-level instructors and/or instructors who are working with a lot of beginners. So often, our beginners allow the horse to go on autopilot, either because the rider lacks confidence or they just don't know how to get an animal that outweighs them by at least 1,000 pounds to do what they want or need them to do. That alone becomes a balancing act for the instructor. How do you keep your awesome school horses working appropriately, and how do you get your beginners to think and respond versus panicking and reacting?  The secret to my success is this: Keep It SUPER Simple! Riding shouldn't resemble a science experiment. I have developed a number of exercises and activities to get beginners to think about what they want to ask their horse to do and the confidence to respond in such a way that our good lesson horses focus on the riders rather than zoning out and going on autopilot. No smoke and mirrors, nothing mind blowing, just some simple exercises.

This presentation would be appropriate for instructors who work in busy programs that serve as first touch or the "put ’em up, take ’em down" programs or the one-time riders. The follow-the-leader method is totally acceptable and a good way to control the chaos so that riders have a really good experience and want to return to further develop their horsemanship skills. Take the kids who really want to show. Imagine that walk/trot class at the county fair...you know the one.  Every student seems to have a magnet on their horse, and all of the horses are either walking or trotting in a group...or in one big bunch, more or less. If you are lucky, your rider will either be at the head of the pack or trailing the pack. That way the judge will have a fighting chance to see them! So how do we, as instructors, teach those riders to get out of their response to the situation, make a choice, and find their spot? Simple, show up and watch my class!

Jo-Anne Young

Jo-Anne has been teaching riding and training horses for more than 40 years and has learned from various elite riders and coaches. She has been a CHA Clinician and Regional Director for many years. She is presenting:

Engaging the Rider’s Core to Engage the Horse’s Core

I will be teaching exercises to help achieve the goal of engaging the rider’s core to engage the horse’s core. Along with exercises, I will have three of the UniSit Strap systems for the riders to try in the workshop. They were developed by Paula Paglia, who is a USDF Gold Medal rider, as well as a trainer and instructor. The system has helped college students in developing an advanced, accurate, and supple seat that has put them on the fast track to advanced levels in their riding. It is also fun to see how much the horses appreciate the riders' improvement through the use of this training aid, which physically shows the rider how to effectively and correctly use his/her core.

Donovan Dobbs

Donovan is a CHA Certified Instructor, who teaches riders of all levels, along with starting colts, working with problem horses, and finishing horses for a variety of western disciplines. He is presenting:

Be a Hero to Your Students, Your Horses, and Yourself

My goal is the same for both horses, students, and myself, which is to try and be better than they were yesterday and prepare to be better tomorrow. One way we should do that is to be a hero. A hero is defined as a person who is admired or idealized for courage, outstanding achievements, or noble qualities. The noble qualities that I believe are exemplary are humility, endurance, relationship, and obedience. I like these because they equally apply to ourselves, our horsemanship, and our teaching. They are separate and distinct qualities but also entwined in a hero. The questions I hope to answer for the audience are how do these qualities apply to ourselves, our horsemanship, and our teaching. The tips will be simple but effective in their application to this goal. The goal is to be a hero in life, in our horsemanship, and in our teaching. 

Larissa Strappello

Larissa is the Facility Manager and a CHA Master Instructor at Houghton College’s Equestrian Program, as well as being a CHA Assistant Clinic Instructor. She is presenting:

Exercises for Horse and Rider Using Dressage Training Principles

My workshop will be covering different dressage exercises and how to teach dressage to all levels, even our most beginner riders. Many times as instructors we forget that even our most beginner students can begin to understand how to get a horse to move correctly from the hind and work on rhythm and relaxation. My hope is to explore different exercises and discuss how you can use the same exercises for your beginner and more advanced riders. We all want our students, whether one is teaching western, jumping, or dressage, to understand the basics of helping the horse use its body correctly. In the workshop, we will discuss strategies to keep all levels of riders engaged and to help our lesson horses stay healthy and happy.  

Gerrie Barnes

Gerrie was designated as the 2012 Horseperson of the Year by the Colorado Horse Council and was the 2016 CHA Riding Instructor of the Year for her teaching, coaching, and mentoring skills. She will be presenting:

Riding the Horse’s Mind: The Psychology and Leadership of the Horse

This topic and my newly published book grew out of the frustrations of many owners and riding students. I’ve watched the horse industry produce more and more clinics, videos, books, and magazine articles devoted to problem-solving.My question is why do the frustrations remain? Most riders who seek out these resources are intelligent and thoughtful and want to be the best rider for their horses. Why do they not gain their horses’ respect?

This presentation introduces you to the missing piece. Although we know about the horse’s herd instinct, as humans we don’t understand the horse’s level of commitment to this instinct; that horses will literally die over their placement in the herd hierarchy. As humans, we have a different set of needs and values. We need to understand the differences in species and commit to the horses’ needs and what they value. Information is provided that hopefully will help attendees understand their horse at a deeper level.

Suggestions are also provided to help owners and riders enhance their interspecies communication, thus, gaining their horses’ trust and respect. These changes in attitude, intent, commitment, and consistency should help improve all aspects of their relationship with their horse. It should solve attendees’ frustrations and instill confidence.

The CHA International Conference is set to take place October 26-29, 2017, in Lexington, KY. For more information, or to register, please visit www.CHAinstructors.com/conference.




<< Previous Page Showing Page 1 of 1 Pages Next Page >>


This entry was posted in About the Certified Horsemanship Association, Continuing Education



There Are No Responses To Previewing the CHA International Conference





Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Name*
Email*
Website
Comments:*
Security Code:*